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Marae Lindquist, a PhD student at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, will study two wintering sparrow populations as a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Margaret A. Davidson Fellow with the North Carolina Coastal Reserve & National Estuarine Research Reserve. She will focus her research on the impacts of sea level rise on wintering populations of the saltmarsh sparrow (Ammospiza caudacuta) and seaside sparrow (Ammospiza maritima).

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The N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Environmental Stewardship Initiative (ESI) is celebrating national Pollution Prevention (P2) Week and the 30th anniversary of the Pollution Prevention Act by hosting a four-day virtual conference to share pollution prevention and sustainability best practices. This week’s virtual conference gives ESI members and other business representatives an opportunity to learn about energy efficiency best practices, water reduction techniques, recycling markets and regulatory topics.

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The North Carolina Division of Coastal Management’s N.C. Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve (“the Reserve”) is seeking a talented individual to join the Reserve team as a Natural Resources Resilience Specialist. We are seeking someone with a strong background in protecting and/or enhancing natural infrastructure as it relates to coastal hazards resilience; environmental planning and natural resource management; or a closely-related field.

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                                            NCGS staff were able to use drone technology to identify the surface expression of fault movement, the dark line in the grass, from the August 9 earthquake in Sparta, NC.   North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) staff members visited the site of the August 9 5.1 magnitude earthquake that hit about 2 miles from Sparta, North Carolina. The purpose of the visit was to document the damage, collect data about the movement at the fault, and add information for inclusion in the NCGS database for the future preparation of landslide hazard maps.  

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Clark Purvis could not have known just how remarkable that striped bass he recently caught would turn out to be. Sure, it was a big fish – 40 inches long – given that it was caught in the Roanoke River. Most striped bass caught in North Carolina’s sounds and rivers range between 16 and 24 inches. But that’s not what made the fish so special. It was the information researchers with the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries’ Tagging Program got from the tag on the fish that showed how extraordinary it was.

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The North Carolina Division of Coastal Management’s N.C. Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve (“the Reserve”) is seeking a talented individual to join the Reserve team as a Geographic Information System (GIS) Specialist. We are seeking someone with a natural resources background that is well-versed in the ESRI platforms (e.g., ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Collector) and experienced with metadata and file structure/organization. The selected applicant must be comfortable working with a team, but also capable of working independently and remotely.

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The N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Division of Coastal Management (DCM) is seeking public comment on its application for funding of the Currituck Banks Reserve Boardwalk – Replacement of Decking Boards by the Public Beach and Coastal Waterfront Access Grant Program for the 2020-21 grant cycle. A project summary can be found here. Members of the public are invited to comment to the Coastal Resources Commission on this project for a minimum of sixty (60) days prior to final funding decisions. Written comments will be accepted through September 13, 2020 at 5 p.m.  

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A state program helped make a historic building in Fayetteville, North Carolina safer for years to come with the removal of two underground storage tanks (USTs) in November of 2019. The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Division of Waste Management worked with the Orange Street School Restoration and Historical Association to have two USTs removed from the property of the Orange Street School. Orange Street School is the oldest public education structure remaining in Fayetteville, and it serves as a reminder of the history of black education in the area. 

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