Coal Ash - Blog

In this video, Secretary Donald R. van der Vaart of the state environmental departments explains how the new coal ash law sets deadlines for providing well owners with water connections, requires dam repairs, and mandates the recycling of coal ash. Assistant Secretary Tom Reeder describes decades of neglect on coal ash and the action that has been taken since 2013. You can watch video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BsbsVxWkP4&feature=youtu.be You can read the new coal ash law here: http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2015/Bills/House/PDF/H630v5.pdf

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DEQ staff recently visited NC A&T University to hear how researchers have discovered methods of recycling coal ash to produce building materials. Read the details here in the Greensboro News & Record: http://www.greensboro.com/news/dan_river/scientists-at-nc-a-t-make-coal-ash-breakthrough/article_7a4ceadc-2c48-57e2-939e-da68234fe1cb.html

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As part of Governor Pat McCrory’s initiative to protect low-income and minority communities from the effects of coal ash, the state environmental agency has evaluated the potential impact of storing ash in a new lined landfill in Wilmington. An initial review found that storing ash in a new landfill near the Sutton Steam Station would have no disproportionate impact on low-income, minority, and other residential communities within a mile of the proposed site.

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The N.C Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has released proposed classifications for the closure of all coal ash ponds in North Carolina. The classifications are based on the current risk each pond presents to public health and the environment and are the culmination of more than two years of scientific evaluation.  In accordance with the coal ash law, DEQ gathered and analyzed comprehensive data about coal ash facilities statewide.  That information has been essential in the classification process for all 14 facilities with coal ash storage ponds. 

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A recent letter to the Winston-Salem Journal described the McCrory administration’s efforts to clean up and close every coal ash pond in the state while taking extra steps to protect minority communities. To read the letter from Tom Reeder, Assistant Secretary for the Environment, click here: http://www.journalnow.com/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/the-readers-forum-thursday-letters/article_3170983a-441a-5101-a901-799181e88eb6.html  

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State environmental officials are extending by one week the public comment period for the Cape Fear, Mayo and Roxboro facilities’ draft proposed risk classifications. Staff with the N.C. Division of Water Resources learned that supplemental reports submitted to the environmental department in late February for the three facilities were not available online until April 14.  In order to give the public adequate time to review and comment on the supplemental information, the department has extended the public comment period for the three facilities until April 25. 

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The state environmental department today delivered a letter to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights thanking its members for giving the state an opportunity at the April 7 town hall meeting in Walnut Cove to share its accomplishments in cleaning up coal ash in North Carolina. At the town hall meeting, Assistant Secretary Tom Reeder discussed the McCrory administration’s commitment to cleanup up coal ash and announced a new initiative to ensure that minority communities are not negatively impacted by Duke Energy’s coal ash disposal sites.

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State environmental officials were notified this week that North Carolina is one step closer to permanently eliminating the threat of coal ash at one of the four high priority sites named in the coal ash law.  The Duke Energy L.V. Sutton Energy Complex has successfully completed the removal of free standing water from its ash basins which immediately reduces the threat of negative environmental impacts. 

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