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Cape Fear River Basin Model

Cape Fear River Basin Model

The Cape Fear River Basin Hydrologic Model is a powerful analysis tool that can be used to study the Cape Fear River Basin as a comprehensive water resources system. The area studied by the model includes the drainage area at Lock and Dam #1, which includes all of the upper basin and much of the lower basin. The model uses the full record of 76 years of streamflow data to simulate the system under any water use scenario the user defines. The model has been used to evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects on the water resources in the basin. It may also be used as a tool for managing drought. A useful feature of the model is its forecasting capability. When in a period of drought, the model can be used to develop a probabalistic forecast of the Jordan Lake elevation and water quality pool.

Cape Fear Model FAQ

Jordan Lake Forecast Archives

Model Update Information

Project Partners

Background Information

Cape Fear Model FAQ

Q. Who Owns the Model?

A.
The model is owned by all citizens of North Carolina. The current version of the model was 75% funded by State funds and 25% by collaborating organization in the Cape Fear Basin. For a list of collaborating funders, click here.
The most typical situation occurs when a water system has an intake and wastewater discharge in different basins. But other situations also cause transfers. One is where a system's service area covers more than one basin. Any water used up or consumed in a portion of the service area outside of the source basin would be considered part of a transfer (e.g. watering your yard). Transfers can also occur between interconnected systems, where a system in one basin purchases water from a system in another basin.
At some level, interbasin transfers can begin to have detrimental effects on the downstream environment and downstream users. The Regulation of Surface Water Transfers Act ensures that large transfers with this potential are subject to thorough technical and environmental review. The Act define 38 separate river basins.

Q. Who Can Access the Model?

A.
Anyone with who needs to use the model to help manage water resources more wisely. The model is accessed via a server housed at the Division of Water Resources. Licensing constraints limit the number of people who can simultaneously access the model to five. If necessary, preference is given to water systems or representatives of water systems in the Cape Fear River Basin.

Jordan Lake Forecast Archives

Model Update Information

Project Partners

Background Information