It's Our Air - 1-6 Making and Using Ozone Indicators

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
How can we find out if there is ozone in the air around our school?
Where on campus can we find the most ozone?

TIME NEEDED: 90 minutes

MATERIALS:

WORKSHEETS

WORKSHEETS

(included)

MAKING THE STRIPS

MAKING THE STRIPS

Potassium iodide
White filter paper
Cornstarch
Glass or plastic stirring rod
Measuring spoons
Masking tape
String
Hole punch
Small paint brush
Beaker, 250 ml
Distilled water
Aprons
Hot plate
Hot pad
Safety goggles (optional)
Low-temperature drying oven (optional)
Heat-safe glass plate (optional)
Microwave oven (optional)

EXPOSING THE STRIPS

EXPOSING THE STRIPS

Distilled water in a spray bottle
Thread
Psychrometer (optional)

INTERPRETING THE STRIPS

INTERPRETING THE STRIPS

Distilled water
Schoenbein color scale (included)
Relative humidity Schoenbein Number Chart (included)

TOPICS: ground-level ozone

TYPES: data collection, data analysis

NC ESSENTIAL STANDARDS for Earth/Environmental Science:

EEn.2.5.1. Summarize the structure and composition of our atmosphere
EEn.2.5.5 Explain how human activities affect air quality

MAKING AND USING OZONE INDICATORS ACTIVITY

In the hands-on activity, students check for the presence and relative amounts of ozone in the air using Schoenbein strips they make with filter paper, cornstarch, and potassium iodide.


MAKING AND USING OZONE INDICATORS - TEACHER TO TEACHER TIPS

The quick video below has tips for doing this activity from Mark Townley, an award-winning, North Carolina high school teacher. Mark helped develop It’s Our Air and has used each of these activities with his students.


 

BACK TO CURRICULUM PAGE

OTHER MODULE 1 (AIR POLLUTANTS & THEIR SOURCES) ACTIVITIES AND VIDEOS

1-1 What Is Air?

1-2 Combustion and Combustion Equations 

1-3 Parts Per Million

1-4 The Criteria Pollutants and a Closer Look at Ozone 

1-5 NC & Local Sources of Air Pollution

1-6 Making and Using Ozone Indicators (this activity)

1-7 Sampling Particulate Matter